legʷh-


legʷh-
    legʷh-
    English meaning: light (adj.)
    Deutsche Übersetzung: “leicht in Bewegung and Gewicht”, verbal ‘sich leicht, flink bewegen”
    Note: nasalized lengʷh-
    Material: 1. O.Ind. laghú-, ved. raghú- “rash, hasty, light, small”, compar. lághīyaṁs-, superl. lághiṣṭha-; Av. ragu-, f. rǝvī “agile”; compar. rǝnjyō, superl. rǝnjišta- (of stem *lengʷh-); zero grade O.Ind. r̥hánt- “weak, small” (“*light”); Av. rǝnjaiti, rǝnjayeiti “makes light, agile, läßt sich bewegen”, O.Ind. ráṁhatē, ráŋghati, láŋghati “rinnt, hurries, springt auf, springt about”; Gk. ἐλαχύς ‘small”, compar. ἐλά̄σσων, Att. ἐλά̄ττων (with secondary ᾱ, s. Schwyzer Gk. 1, 538 and Anm. 4), superl. ἐλάχιστος (ἐλαχύς from IE *legʷhú -, as Slav. lьgъkъ and Celt. *lag- ; O.Ind. laghú- perhaps also or zero grade as Lat. levis); ἐλαφρός “light, agile” (probably from *lṇgʷhrós = O.H.G. lungar); after Schwyzer Gk. 1, 302 though contaminated from *ἐλαχρός (= O.H.G. lungar) and *ἐλαφός (from *-χFος = Lith. leñgvas); perhaps Ion. λωφᾶν ‘sich erholen, relax, slacken, trans. erleichtern, entlassen, befreien”; Illyr. lembus (*lengʷho-s) “leichtes Fahrzeug”, out of it Gk. λέμβος, Lat. lembus ds.; oberItal. FlN Lambrus (: ἐλαφρός), Krahe, Gymnasium 59 (1952), 79; Lat. levis “light, quick, fast, leise” (based on auf dem f. *legʷhu̯ ī to m. *legʷhú -s); O.Ir. compar. laigiu (and laugu) ‘small, bad” = M.Welsh llei, Welsh llai “minor”, Corn. le ds. Bret. -lei in O.Bret. nahu-lei “nihilominus” (Proto-Celt. *lag-i̯ōs, IE *legʷh-, see above), superl. O.Ir. lugimem and lugam, M.Welsh lleiaf, O.Bret. lau, M.Welsh llaw ‘small” (out of it M.Ir. lau, lū ds.), O.Ir. lagat “parvitas”; O.Ir. lingim ‘spring” (preterit leblaing with analogical imitation of p : b-reduplication), O.Ir. lēimm, Welsh etc. llam ‘sprung” (*lṇg-smen-); Maybe Alb. (*leiht) lehtë “light”. Goth. leihts, O.E. léoht, O.Ice. lēttr, O.H.G. līht(i) “light”, nDutch licht n. “ placenta, afterbirth “ (*linχta-, IE *lengʷh-to-); O.S. lungor, O.H.G. lungar “quick, fast”, O.E. lungre adv. “quick, fast, bald” (*lṇgʷhro-, see above); O.H.G. gilingan “ proceed, go ahead, Erfolg have, succeed”, M.H.G. lingen “vorwärtskommen”; Lith. leñgvas, lengvùs, Ltv. liêgs “light”; O.C.S. lъgъkъ (*legʷhu-, see above) “light”, lьgota “ lightness”, O.C.S. (je) lьzě “es is erlaubt” (dat. sg. to lьga), po-lьdza, po-lьza “benefit”, russ lьzja, old lьzě “es is possible, man possibly “, besides lьga, ds. (etc.). 2. Here also appellation the Lunge (light as die ũbrigen Fleischteile, schwimmt in Wasser above): O.H.G. lungūn pl., O.E. lungen, O.N. lunga n. “Lunge”, Eng. lights “Tierlungen”, Russ. lëgkoje “Lunge”; hence also Arm. lanjk” “brost” (older “*Lunge”; *lṇgʷhi̯o-).
    References: WP. II 426 f., WH. I 788 f., Trautmann 158 f., Kuiper Nasalpräs. 143.

Proto-Indo-European etymological dictionary. 2015.

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